Giumarra to supply Glacier Fresh Montana cherries




Los Angeles-based Giumarra Cos. will work with Glacier Fresh to market the orchard’s Montana cherry harvest this summer.

“We are excited to partner with a like-minded company to expand our premium cherry category,” Craig Uchizono, Giumarra’s vice president for the Southern Hemisphere, said in a news release.

Founded in 2001, Glacier Fresh is in the Flathead Lake region of western Montana.

“Our farms have traditionally been focused on growing high-quality fruit for the export market,” Cody Herring, owner of Glacier Fresh, said in the release. “In working with Giumarra, we both felt it would be advantageous to introduce this fruit to retail customers in the U.S.”

Harvest begins in late July, with Rainiers and dark red varieties available. The cherries will be available bulk or packaged in Glacier Fresh-brand pouch bags.

Glacier Fresh works with Montana growers to pack and ship more than 1 million pounds of fruit, accounting for more than 25% of the state’s annual cherry harvest.

Herring said he visited large growing operations in Europe and New Zealand during his most recent off-season, and ultimately invested in sorting equipment with advanced computer software to digitally monitor size and quality on the pack line.“We are excited to partner with a like-minded company to expand our premium cherry category,” Craig Uchizono, Giumarra’s vice president for the Southern Hemisphere, said in a news release.

Founded in 2001, Glacier Fresh is in the Flathead Lake region of western Montana.

“Our farms have traditionally been focused on growing high-quality fruit for the export market,” Cody Herring, owner of Glacier Fresh, said in the release. “In working with Giumarra, we both felt it would be advantageous to introduce this fruit to retail customers in the U.S.”

Harvest begins in late July, with Rainiers and dark red varieties available. The cherries will be available bulk or packaged in Glacier Fresh-brand pouch bags.

Glacier Fresh works with Montana growers to pack and ship more than 1 million pounds of fruit, accounting for more than 25% of the state’s annual cherry harvest.

Herring said he visited large growing operations in Europe and New Zealand during his most recent off-season, and ultimately invested in sorting equipment with advanced computer software to digitally monitor size and quality on the pack line.